Painting

Carriage Ride Series

These paintings came out of the ideas from the magazine I made called St. Petersburg: 1980.

Carriage Ride! You control the STRANGER as they journey through a world of sin. Each level you must navigate various obstacles until you reach the RIVER. As you encounter various sins your SPIRIT-CARRIAGE will slow and become more difficult to control.

Struggle on, wayfaring stranger and you might just make it to the Bonus Levels. On the other hand, if sin weighs you down, you could find yourself navigating the Penalty Levels.

Carriage Ride: Level 1: River Jordan

Dimensions of Original: 11 X 16 X 0.5 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Carriage Ride: Level 2: Ohio River

Dimensions of Original: 11 X 16 X 0.5 inches (Acrylic, Pencil Shavings and Wire)

Carriage Ride: Level 3: Manatee River

Dimensions of Original: 20 X 24 X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Carriage Ride: Bonus Level

Dimensions of Original: 30 X 40 X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Carriage Ride: Penalty Level

Dimensions of Original: 30 X 40 X 0.5 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Carriage Ride: Cut Scene

Dimensions of Original: 30 X 40 0.5 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Unrestful Peasants Series

These paintings come from my work on the magazine St. Petersburg: 1980 also. But I started work on a table-top board game, based on the fictional video game in the magazine. So, these paintings actually pull more from the real board game I am developing.

The video game Build a Funky Ziggurat is what I imagined an alien would make as a tool for propaganda if they didn’t understand Earth very well.

That is, if an alien came to Earth and if their culture had spanned hundreds of thousands of years, to them they wouldn’t distinguish much between slang from the 1980’s and the language of Sumerian/Babylonian civilizations. They would probably just mix it up. Because to them, 3,000 years would be such a tiny time and they wouldn’t see humanity as having changed much.

The development of the board game will blend 80’s aesthetics in the form of graphics and text with the language of the ancient mid-east. What I mean by that is a kind of epic or heroic tone, more than anything. I’m not actually writing the instructions in Akkadian.’

Unrestful Peasants is the first series within the wider Build a Funky Ziggurat series. The idea began to morph as I looked at the simplistic design of a peasant holding a pitchfork and began to think about social media and the internet.

Recently, I gained representation as a visual artist in Miami and had to answer questions about my artwork. The following is from that written piece and it explains the series fairly well:

The Unrestful Peasants series I’m working on concerns how ephemeral argument is in the digital age. Not only is the dialogue degraded in online spaces, the very context of online forums is constrained, managed and sometimes manipulated. It’s a place constantly responding, deranged by and malformed by the opinion of the day, the opinion of the moment.

The peasants with the pitchforks, they are the users of social media. Online space feels like a digital bandwagon burdened with trash on fire, but it’s so common that I’m not sure anyone even pays attention for more than a moment. I’m not sure how you solve a river, you just watch it flow.

There’s something disappointing about social media, new media and the internet at the present time. I grew up on dial-up with the idea that finally there might be a way to make connections with people, to share ideas (all the more important growing up in a small Kentucky town) and that’s all happened, it’s true.

There are just some very unfortunate consequences playing out when everyone is connected but simultaneously separated and set against each other by advertising mechanisms which undergird the structure of the internet.

The series might be understood as a warning to think before you speak or to value the approach of silence. But I’m still working on these paintings and this is just how I’m thinking at the moment. My ideas will change as I do the work.

Unrestful Peasants #1

Dimensions of Original: 14 X 11 X 0.2 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Unrestful Peasants: Deformed Children of the Information Superhighway

Dimensions of Original: 14 X 11 X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Unrestful Peasants: Out of the Context

Dimensions of Original: 14 X 11 X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Unrestful Peasants: Thanksgiving in Cyberspace

Dimensions of Original: 14 X 11 X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Unrestful Peasants: Enhanced, Like in the Movies

Dimensions of Original: 11 X 14 X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Unrestful Peasants: Block Codes

Dimensions of Original: 14 X 11 X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Welcome to Florida Series

I have a strange relationship with the state of Florida. I wasn’t born here, which is not unique but I’ve lived here off and on over the past two decades.

I think it’s a truly wonderful paradise/wasteland. These paintings are kind of like what it would be like if I were in charge of tourist brochures for the state of Florida. It’s the most honest approach to the state I can think of.

There are a lot of possums in the paintings. Possums fleeing and conspiring and gathering, flying spaceships.

I’ve really just started with this series and hope to work on them for years to come.

Welcome to Florida Number 1

Dimensions of Original: 11 X 14 inches X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Welcome to Florida: Bird on a Wire During the Last Storm

Dimensions of Original: 12 X 16 X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Welcome to Florida: The Sunbathers

Dimensions of Original: 20 X 24 inches X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Welcome to Florida: Serotonin Seeking Sea Cow

Dimensions of Original: 36 X 24 X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Welcome to Florida: Dancing at the Convenience Store

Dimensions of Original: 30 X 40 X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Welcome to Florida: Twilight Hour

Dimensions of Original: 11 X 14 X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)

Welcome to Florida: Alligator Versus Donuts

Dimensions of Original: 20 X 24 X 1 inches (Acrylic and Wire)